Smoky Mountain Historic Sites

There are so many opportunities to experience the rich history of the region by visiting Smoky Mountain historic sites such as: Bud Ogle Cabin, Cades Cove, Elkmont, the Lost CCC Camp, Rockefeller Monument, and Walker Sisters Cabin.

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Elkmont

Elkmont is located on a flat valley at the junction of Little River and Jakes Creek. Surrounded by steep ridges, the valley is shadowed by Meigs Mountain to the west and Sugarland Mountain to the east.

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Cades Cove

Cades Cove was once a remote place in the Great Smoky Mountains. One of the few ways through the Smokies and into the cove was along Indian trails. Some of those trails were improved into roads. One of those trails was called, appropriately enough, Cades Cove road.

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Rockefeller Monument

In 1940 President Franklin D. Roosevelt dedicated the Great Smoky Mountains National Park for the “permanent enjoyment of the people.” He spoke from the Rockefeller Monument at Newfound Gap.

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Only In Your State

Lost CCC Camp

In 1933 President Roosevelt started the Civilian Conservation Corps, or CCC, to try and solve two problems; reforestation of the nation’s timber resources, and unemployment during the great depression.

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Bud Ogle Cabin

The Bud Ogle Cabin, built in the late 19th century by it’s namesake, Noah “Bud” Ogle, was a farm and cabin located in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

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The Saturday Evening Post

Walker Sisters Cabin

The Walker Sisters were the only family who choose not to sell their land to the National Park Service when the Smokies became a National Park. The six Walker sisters watched from the only home they had ever known as their lifelong neighbors moved after selling their land to the park.

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