Synchronous Fireflies Flash for Love


The Smoky Mountains are the perfect place for a summer fling, especially if you’re a firefly.

For two weeks each June the synchronous fireflies look for love by putting on a simultaneous light show in the Elkmont area of the park, each male lighting up at the same time to attract their perfect summer mate.

The synchronous fireflies‘ light show is quite the spectacle and continues to attract thousands of visitors to the national park year after year. This season, the park is gearing up to make the most of the firefly-viewing experience and will offer spectators shuttle service from the Sugarland Visitors Center to the viewing area in Elkmont June 6-13.  

Reservations for the shuttle service and event parking will be accepted starting April 29. Advance registration is required to take advantage of this service, and spots are expected to sell out very quickly.

You can learn more about the synchronous fireflies or reserve your spot by visiting and searching for the Great Smoky Mountains firefly event. The trolley/shuttle fee is $1 per person, and riders will be required to pay in exact change. Parking passes start at $1.50.

According to info from the National Park Service,  the synchronous fireflies are one variety out of at least 19 species of lightning bugs found in the Great Smoky Mountains. They are the only species in American that lights up in chorus.

The flashing is more than just display: It’s actually part of a complex mating process  that ensures the survival of future generations of these beautiful beetles. The all-at-once flashing pattern across the night sky lets females make sure they’re attracting members of their own species.

The firefly event is a great experience for a nature-curious family, or could even be a low-key, romantic date for a couple. Make the most of your time in the Smokies by taking advantage of‘s trip planning resources, including Pigeon Forge lodging information, things to do in the Smokies, and more!

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